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. some join right out of high school with the promise that they can further their education while in the military. this helps not only our troops but an educated military helps america. now the administration has broken another promise. thousands of troops can no longer go to college because the education program has been scuttled. for the sake of politics, the chicken little administration has handpicked programs to cut that would make americans feel the sequester the most. one of those programs is the military tuition assistance program. mr. speaker, tuition assistance for our military is not much money. the pentagon, the department of defense, has a budget of $700 billion. this little program is .1% of e $700 billion department of defense program. the tuition assistance program is great because it's one of the ways our government can take care of our men and women who help us. it's allowed members of the military to take 870,000 courses and graduate 50,000 individuals from many degrees. that is remarkable. but the program is gone thus sayeth the white house. the over the past f
a better education than you. and in fact, the reverse is happening. women entering the work force are often better educated, with more academic and trade certifications than men who are doing it. and women are also doing hard and dangerous jobs. we can look to what they do in the military. they can look at how we see them as firefighters and police officers and prison guards. under the legislative i am proposing, no longer will women be on their own and fighting for equal pay or for equal work. in this country, we say work hard and play by the rules, you'll get ahead. we work hard every day but we find that the rules are different for women and for men. actually, the rules in many workplaces are rigged against us. so, mr. president, i would hope that we would pass my amendment today that would allow us to be able to go forward later on in the year and pass paycheck fairness. it is important to the women in the workplace and it's important to our economy. much is being said here about being pro growth. who isn't pro growth? of course we want to grow our economy. and if we look at the tax str
in order to get this. we are educated people with means. and resources. it's that difficult for us. the system is broken. not only that, if the high-tech companies really want to fulfill the jobs they have, that they say, however there are, 80,000 that microsoft put out the other day, that in the industry they don't have enough engineers, they are not going to be able to get that bill passed through this congress. thinking pragmatic i. will they won't get it done without a comprehensive piece. what rand paul did today is maybe he disappointed a lot of people in love with him last week. but i think the good thing about him is he has true core beliefs. there is a lot worse that you could have in washington today. >> andrea: i do doubt that the republican party will be able to pull the voters in the party. but from right thing to do perspective, i feel like is it the right thing to do. maybe that's just because of my father's story and i see how hard he worked. i do see that there is dependency issues. i get that with every gender and ethnicity. i get that. everybody is susceptible to
guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation and infrastructure necessary to job creation and economic growth and protects the middle class from these large tax increases. the democratic alternative reduces the deficit in a fiscal and responsible way and a balanced way. without causing harm today and without threatening our economic competitiveness for the future and reduces the deficit while meeting our commitment to our seniors, our elderly and to our children. i urge my colleagues to reject the republican budget that threatens our seniors, our middle class and our economic growth and to vote for the democratic alternative that builds on our great strength as a nation. innovative entrepreneurial business sector, skilled rs hard-working middle class, vote for the democratic alternative that will builds on hope, security and opportunity for all americans. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: the gentlelady from pennsylvania said that ending medicare as we know it. i got news for you, obamacare ends medicare as we know it. it
that relates to energy, about investing in education so we are competitive and number-one, to build and strengthen and sustained at have commitment to our seniors, whether their economic or their health security. in contrast to the ryan bill, which cuts almost $100 billion from $98 billion, from pell grants. $100 billion from pell grants --pet and crack grants grants. and is a job loser in the short and long term. the contrast could not have been different. one, a statement of our values, that is in support of the middle class, the backbone of our democracy, again, honoring the bows of left-handers, the other, a job loser, and ends the medicare guarantee, and makes it more difficult for young people to afford a college education. in,hat is the week we are and now our members will be taking that message home about the contrast in budget desert -- theout observance of the third-year anniversary of the affordable care act and what that means in the lives of american working families and a celebration of the fact that we have a new inspirational leader in rome. mention theot underfundin
for themselves and their families when you take away head start that means kids won't be the educational foundation that they need i think politicians should do the right thing all the time. that's it for today. come on back again tomorrow. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show". [♪ theme music ♪] >> hal: very exciting morning. it's hal sparks, of course. how are you? good to see you. and i'm filling in for steph and the mooks as they are referred to commonly on this side of the aisle anyway. but the person i believe that there is actually no -- no pejorative that either fits nor is truly descriptive of is of course, jacki schechner. >> oh aren't you sweet. >> hal: i can think of all sorts of untoward things but of course this is the news jacki schechner. >> yeah, wait until we get to the end of the week and then you can decide what you want to call me? >> all right. >> you want to do the news? >> i do. >> president obama will nomination [ inaudible ]. he served in labor licensing regulation. he has a good history for fighting for the common man, and enjoys huge sup
were widely denied an education. now, more than eight million students attend afghan schools and more than 40% of them are female. in 2001 afghanistan had 20,000 teachers, all male. today there are 200,000 teachers including 60,000 women. the number of schools in afghanistan has grown from 3400 in 2001 to more than 16,000 today. per capita gdp has grown fourfold since 2001. afghan life expectancy has increased 20 years since then. more than 18 million afghans now have telephone access compared to about one million ten years ago. now these facts do not eliminate the difficulties that we face. they continue insurgency, a neighbor, pakistan that remains a safe haven for insurgents moving across the border. an ineffective and often corrupt central government and other major barriers to stability and to progress. just as it is important for us to be realistic about the challenges that we face in afghanistan, it's also important that we recognize the advances that have an bp made. so that we can reinforce actions that promote success. i just mentioned two here. the first is to continue to w
think would probably help the city a lot more focusing on education and focusing in terms of economic development. you know, i just have to say -- >> of course his argument is this is critical of a critical public health issue and people who smoke cost millions if not billions of dollars a year. >> but again, sort of return on the time you're going to spend. given the fact that it's not like it is going to stop people from buying vigts. i mean, they can still walk in and purchase them. i just think it is an interesting use of his time and i have to say that i think the city would be better served if he focused on education as opposed to this. >> doug, the head of the new york association of convenience stores is not happy about this. here's what he had to say about it. we think it's patently absurd. can you think of any other retail business licensed to sell legal products that is required to hide them from the view of its customers? he right? >> well, i think that's because the tobacco industry spends about a billion dollars in direct marketing toward -- they make payments to these c
educational technology like broadband that our students need to succeed. this plan creates an infrastructure bank to leverage public funds with private investment. it invests in our workers by making sure they have the skills and training they need to move into the 3.6 million jobs businesses across the country are trying to fill. and it is fully paid for by closing loopholes and cutting unfair spending in the tax code that mainly benefits the well off and well connected. our budget also makes sure we are not reducing our fiscal deficit while increasing our deficits in education and skills and infrastructure and innovation. while cutting spending responsibly overall, it protects our investments in national middle class and economic priorities like our schools and our roads and bridges and our clean energy and manufacturing industries. mr. president, this budget puts jobs first and our economy first and foremost, but it also builds on the work we've done over the last two years to tackle our deficit and debt responsibly. you know, in 2010, president obama established the national commission o
the polarized the geological lead as we bring to bear. what did we achieve in education or environmentalism or what's not and in that sense, mayors suggests their accessibility to us but ultimately the real question is army is not in vulnerable to influence? our mayors on the side of big money or not? as compared to what? what in the world system? my view is mayors and councilors and citizens of cities are a great place to start because cds around world remain more cosmopolitan and open and tolerant and floral and more creative than the alternative entities at the state and national level. why not make a bet on them? we bet on the nation's state for 400 years and i am not sure in the 20 first century that that is paying off? lana please democratic that on the city for a while lands see what they can do? is worth making that bet. >> turn it over to the audience. listen. i said that when i had the opportunity. when it is on the ballot by a vote for the parliament of mayors. i went on to say some of the things that could not accomplish, would not accomplish, some of the terrible obstacles the
of it -- >> on the delivery end. >> hal: right. maybe their decision-making procession will be slightly more educated? >> yeah, i think there are a couple of things. i think hagel got nominated at least in part because a lot of the job of the secretary of defense going forward is going to be caring for the people who fought the two wars and having somebody who served the way he did is a good idea. and kerry was the obvious choice once the other thing blew up. >> hal: even before. but i also think it points to -- because he was always a good idea for it even with or without susan rice. he apparently wanted it it was not a -- obviously i think one of the reasons that republicans were so happy with it because they felt they could get an open seat to shoe horn scott brown back in. but here he is picking people for big cabinet positions that are uniquely qualified for the first time. >> yeah, and i think -- you know -- i mean i don't want get entirely sidetracked on this not on a day when mark sanford is back on the ballot -- >> hal: yeah. against stephen colbert's sister. >> no. >
and innovation that relates to energy. it's about investing in education so that we are competitive and number one to build that, strengthens and sustains our commitment to our seniors, whether it's their economic or their health security. in contrast to the ryan bill, billion, almost $100 $the 8 billion from pell grants, $100 billion from pell grants, and in the decade ends the is a job uarantee loser in the short-term and even more so in the long-term. so the contrast could not have been different. one, a statement of our values to support of the middle class, which is the backbone of our democracy. again honoring the vows of our founders. the other a job loser ends the medicare guarantee and makes it more difficult for young people to afford a college education. be - now our members will taking that message home about the contrast in budget priorities about the observance of the third year anniversary of health care, affordable care act, and what that means in the lives of america's working families. and in celebration of the fact that we have a new inspirational leader until rome, pope f
in education and if they want to get involved, it's completely up to them, students first.org it doing, according to many critics and others, all kinds of interesting work. most importantly, the book -- there's a lady that asked a question. she has two or throw books. the book has received incredible reviews. i you have any stake in education or education means anything to you personally, your kids, your family, the future of the country, they're pointing to many individuals, it's a must-read and i'd strongly recommend. so, in that note, please join in the thanking michelle rhee. [applause] >> up next, after words with guest host jamie weinstein. this week, kim ghattas and her book: the secretary, a journey with hillary clinton from beirut to the heart of american power." she conditions miss clinton's role, and whether u.s. power is in decline. the program is about an hour. >> where we should begin is to talk about your biography. i think as much as this book is about hillary clinton and her time as secretary of state, it's also about your experience from beirut to covering the secret
are educated about rape and consent? >> absolutely. i think given the age of the offenders, given the age of the victims, it is so clear that the perpetrators were operating with impunity, that the education about consent needs to begin much earlier, that they believed they were above the law, and that when they were documenting it, they didn't realize that what they were doing is creating evidence in a criminal case. they believed that because the coach had their backs, which suggests that this is a long-standing cultural issue, that absolutely nothing would happen to them. so instead of focusing on the victims' behavior, what we should be focusing on is how do we intervene in this culture that tells boys that they don't have to respect women as humans, and if they sexually humiliate young girls, absolutely nothing will happen to them. if there's anything we can learn from this one verdict, it is the fact that people need to understand what consent is and intervene in a toxic culture of mass cue lynnity. >> speaking about the toxic culture of masculinity, you of course spent a great deal
' attitudes about same-sex marriage. >> i think will & grace probably did more to educate the american public than anything anybody's done so far. >> on this, supporters and opponents of same-sex marriage agree, hollywood has been influential of encouraging acceptance of gays and lesbians. it was through the medium of television that millions of americans first had open gays and lesbians in their living rooms. >> i can accept the fact that he's gay, but why does he have to slip a ring on this guy's finger? it was even fodder for the "golden girls". >> everyone wants someone to grow old with. shouldn't everyone have that chance? >> i'm judd. >> in 1994, pedro on the real world san francisco introduced a gay man with hiv/aids to millions of then-teenagers. he died that year and was praised by president clinton. ♪ so no one told you life was gonna be this way ♪ >> it helped to create an environment of acceptance where more and more gays and lesbians came out of the closet. the six friends may have all been straight, but more and more americans have friends that are not. and that's what's cha
find something pretty big in the department of education. we'll tell what you is up there. >>> a manhunt is underway after a prison director is gunned down in cold blood in his own home. ♪ [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums martha: this is a possible big setback for gun control advocates. senate majority leader harry reid says that he is dropping the assault weapons ban part of this which is really what we've been talking about all along. dropping that from the senate's gun control package. i'm joined by senator scott brown who is not at all surprised by this action. the former u.s. senator and fox news contributor joins us now. senator, good to have you with us to america's newsroom. >> thank you very much. martha: a lot of people talked about the big talk on sought weapons ban and it was so important to be passed. now it is not in the bill and been deleted. >> he is particular harry
, energy, the environment and education. also the cpc does not want to cut entitlements. and, wants to give unemployed americans 99 weeks of cash compensation. nearly two years. the question is what does president obama think of the congressional progressive caucus? my opinion, he likes it i don't think the president believes that crew is fanatical because they want what he wants. by the way, the far left kooks do want to cut one thing, defense spending. they want to bring that back down to 2006 level. somewhere in iran is cheering. there comes a point when americans are going to have to decide what country, what kind of country they want. even taking half of what affluent americans earn, feds couldn't possibly afford what the far left wants to provide. so we would eventually become greece or cyprus if the u.s. dollar collapses and people stop lending us money. some conservatives believe that's exactly what the far left wants. a collapse of the entire capitalistic system. some on the right believe that president obama is actively working toward that. certainly senator bernie sanders of verm
for the state's economic i approval. not only is tom palken challenging him the failure to fix education, to deal with transportation and state issues in texas but also a coalition of bipartisan coalition of the legislature are not happy with his tenure. the blue may be off the road and rick perry in texas. >> michael: how could it be on at all. a little more on texas. on the showed we haddier my bird founder of battleground texas. let's take a listen of this clip clip. >> people think of text as a red state, a beat red state but that's only the people who are turning out to vote. right now we're getting less than 50% of the population that is participating in elections. what we have to do is expand the electorate, bring more people in the process through registration and have better turnout. texas is not as red as it is seen today. >> michael: you hail right at ground zero from the progressive movement there. what are dems trying to do and are they going to be able to penetrate this seemingly impenetrable cass. >> well, jeremy is exactly right in everything that he had to say, but thes
's a situation that's out there. we will see what happens with the cases. >> jamie: businesses and educators are coming together to keep cash-strapped schools open. but not everyone's on board. critics i say kids are getting the short end of that deal. [ male announcer ] let's say you pay your guy around 2% to manage your money. that's not much, you think. except it's 2% every year. go to e-trade and find out how much our advice and guidance costs. spoiler alert: it's low. it's guidance on your terms, not ours. e-trade. less for us. more for you. with google now, it automatically knows when you need to leave for the airport, how much traffic there is, and can have your boarding pass ready. the droid razr maxx hd by motorola. droid-smart. droid-powerful. ♪ i want a weed free season, that's how i roll ♪ ♪ so i reach for roundup extended control ♪ ♪ with the all-new, no pump, one-touch wand ♪ ♪ it kills weeds dead and keeps weeds gone ♪ [ whip cracks ] ♪ roundup extended control ♪ i just spray them weeds, then spray them cracks ♪ ♪ the weeds are gone, and they won't be b
educated married mothers find themselves not uninterested in the conversation about having it all, but untouched by it. they are too busy minding their grandmother's old fashioned lives for values. like heirlooms and wear proudly as their own. joining the table is former news anchor campbell brown and editor and chief of "cosmopolitan" magazine and joanne coles is with us and also is katty kay. when you looked as thee numbers and sort of trend that you track here, what is behind it? is it a choice or reality? >> i think this is an economy story. these are not very affluent women who are educated in the ivy league who are fleeing their law firm jobs. these are women whose families are earn much less and in a world where our financial futures are uncertain and we don't know what is going to become of us and you're not making that much money and you've got two little kids and your husband is working all the time, it makes sense to lean out and focus on the home sphere. >> is that what you're finding the women that you interviewed, the one that you interviewed and the women you talked
about maybe the voter being somewhat -- i do not want to be better educated, but you understand that an effective member has to negotiate and has to compromise to come to some sort of final product. otherwise you will never get a final product. >> i agree with -- what is the biggest problem we face today? it is this fiscal crisis, the budget. families are looking at it and saying i have got to deal with this all the time, and you guys cannot deal with it. the biggest thing to me would be the leadership of congress to recognize that the budget process has to be utilized in a way that gets this issue resolved, because if we go every three months with more indecision and 11th-hour -- january 2 decision-making, the frustration that people have to live their lives and cannot figure out the process, it will drive them nuts and create the most negative feelings in the world. t is the responsibility of leadership to make this process work, and they have to act like leaders, like tom daschle did and some of the other folks. >> changing the rules might change the incentive structure, but
and educate the people in pakistan? the administration has the power and ability to make it right. but this program is not reinstated, i'm going to introduce legislation to withhold nondefense foreign aid from pakistan until this wonderful program for our troops is fully funded. >> brian: he will introduce the bill in a few hours. we gave pakistan $12.7 million for education last year, a quarter of the tuition help needed for the marines. >> anna: in a stunning new report on mammograms, researchers saying 60% of abnormal mammograms turn out not to be cancer and they can lead to unnecessary surgery or biopsy. this is taking a serious mental toll on some patients. women who received a false positive report that they have anxiety and depression three years after learning that they're cancer free. >> steve: meanwhile, here is a story you'll be talk being all day. tv anchors are supposed to be ready for anything that they read on the teleprompter, right? >> and we do have some breaking news to report to you. fox 54 has just learned that a huntsville news anchor is being proposed on liv
a conflict in vietnam to research the history. >> that's right, and assuming they're educated, assume they had some education on the vietnam war. how do you miss it? and a b-52 bomber is in a park with a plaque on it. i mean, you have to be an idiot to miss that and so, i'll then say about the young producers they may not have lived during vietnam, but idiotic to have done something like that. >> megyn: the plaque on site talks how the american empire was destroyed and it's unambiguous once you get the translation, i assume, what exactly this stands for and why it was memorialized in the way it is, the wreckage on site. i want to ask you about the overall show, bob, because it wasn't like this is a singular incident in the amazing race episode where they went to vietnam. there was another instance they made the contestants memorize the lyrics to a patriotic vietnamese song and pro communist song and here is some of that, stand by. >> this requires them to watch the performance of a patriotic vietnamese song and they'll reveal the words of a celebrated quote. ♪ >> like one direction
than any other time; progressive education, where we've spent more per capita on students but are getting less and less return on the test scores. those aren't my ideas, morals, ideals, and values, that's the other side's. so i'm trying to get them to defend their philosophy and get a controversy and debate going with this book. >> where were you born? >> i was born in washington, d.c. my mother was there at the time, so it was convenient for both of us. >> and what were your parents doing here? >> well, my dad was a very successful salesman. my mom is a homemaker and is still living. he sold business equipment, calculating machines, and move here at the age of 19 from another washington-- washington, indiana, the oldest of nine children. he and all of his brothers were in the army during world war ii and never expected to give birth, to sire a journalist like myself. there was nobody like me in the family, and i thk there are some family members who may be grateful for that. >> and how many brothers and sisters? >> well, i have one brother, a younger brother. >> what's he
on the state, education, general fund. >> new york and california, 100 percent goes to education. most of it is to -- pennsylvania all to senior citizens. veterans affairs, that teach thing. there are some states, like rhode island, where it can go into the general fund and the state can use it as its session. as i said, they have plenty of things to spend it on now. >>heather: so, do you think more states will consider having the lottery? >> they don't have any money. they are either going to raise taxes which is not popular at all or cut spending and they are doing all of those things. this has proven to be such a huge money maker for states. it's $20 billion more in just a few years they is earned. it is a lot of money. >>heather: you mention the payout of $4 2 billion in prize money and that was included because we were all offer it, and the payout included $587 million powerball jackpot in 2012 and now we have $338 million and already this year in 2013. >> but the winners do not get all that money. uncle sam takes his and it depends whether you take a lump sum. 80 percent choose t
of the divisions. when you look at his policies what he stands for, abolishing the departments of education, commerce, trade, the federal reserve. i think when he gets more out there in the public, when he's not just giving a talk at cpac, i just think that what he says is going to be too extreme for members of the republican party who support still the hawkish line of american involvement in the world and i think for clearly when he gets into i think into middle america, for running for anything like a presidential nomination that would be a very tricky position, some of those domestic issues, too. >> eugene, this is coming at a time that the gop is trying to reconfigure, the autopsy, what do you do to a corpse to bring it back to life? there are specific policy recommendations, raines preeb is's document. one was about gay marriage and one was about immigration. how do you move the party on those issues when you're still dealing with fundamentals in terms of personality. >> a lot of people in the republican party got the message, got those messages at least from the election. and are read
shortage in ireland. he wants more emphasis on science and mathematics education for irish kids, and an open door to bright young people like chugh from everywhere. >> we're looking at short-term, medium-term, long-term. we're going to change how we change work permits for non- irish national, so that will help bring in a lot more skilled computer science people into the irish economy. that will help bring in a lot more qualified, skilled computer science into the irish economy. >> suarez: but to have a healthy domestic economy, ireland can't just create great jobs for manipulating data on microchips. there's a role for potato chips too. this family has been growing potatoes for generations. irish potato consumption waned during the economic boom as irish tastes changed. the youngest generation of this family look for new markets and started a new business. gourmet potato chips called crisps here, kettled in small batches. after 18 months, they're selling in europe, asia, and to high-end american grocers. food was noted again and again by the experts as an export sector where ir
fallon have not been able to match. your youtube channel is huge. >> it educates you because it is very democratic. people are really voting for what they think is funny by watching it and passing it around to their friends. >> i would like the people who are at home watching the emmys right now to help me pull a big prank on the people who are not watching. it's been a big year for kimmel and in addition to the emmys and providing comedy for the white house correspondents association dinner he got engaged. so you're marrying one of your writers. >> i am, yes. she got hired as a writer's assistant and she started writing jokes. after a while it became obvious that we had to hire her as a writer. her material was so strong. for me, weirdly, that's like a -- that just -- that's really like what attracted me to her. she's funny. >> why is that weird? that's nice. >> i guess it's good but it is weird to be, you know, to have a work assignment be what attracted you to somebody. that is kind of -- >> that's not weird. you're in love with her mind. >> there you go. >> i mean she is very beauti
,000 per child on public schools and they don't provide an education that allows people to move forward. we need to give parents choices on how to take some of their own money and go to private schools or parochial schools or home school, and give people those opportunities so the competition can provide a better education for people. i think you're quite right that the government has damaged the hopes and opportunities and the ability to move forward of millions of americans. they've got regulations that kill jobs. how many americans could be building the pipeline they wanted to bring down through nebraska, and the government spent four years delaying that. that's tens of thousands of jobs, people could have gotten the first job of their life, stopped by that. we need to do more exploration in alaska and other places. again, tens, hundreds of thousands of jobs. the champber of commerce estimates a million jobs killed by government enact. people need to be treated fair live with the government and that's not happening. >> coming up, congressman steve pierce of new mexico discusses the repub
third week. michigan's head start program could be next on the shopping block. nbc's chief education correspondent rehema ellis is joining me this afternoon from detroit and rehema, with a long distance hello to you, my friend, for many students in detroit there are problems with this education system which are now magnified by the statewide economic troubles. you kn i know you were talking about this issue with the governor. >> we were, and we're going to talk about it all with students when we have a town hall meeting here just a little while from now that everybody can watch online on education nation.com. but the governor says that they have no choice but to make some changes here because of the dire situation that they're in as far as their budget is concerned. the changes have been controversial. but when you think about it, just this one quick statistic, 27% of african-american students who are in the 11th grade and only 62% of white students in the 11th grade are reading at or above proficiency. and the governor says they have got to do better than that. just listen. >> if yo
, how far do you go if it's really for the kids, how far do you go? >> it's about education. it's good they don't have the commercials on tv but bocks behind the counter. some of these places in new york. it's so small, i don't know where they put it. they have to put the candy bars up there. i don't know. >> i agree, where do you draw the line. >> and candy bars, where do you stop? got to hide the candy bars too. >> with the cigarettes. >> there you go. >> everyone seems to appreciate a good implosion here or there. >> why not savor the moment by dragging it out a little bit longer. >> all right. it only took a few seconds for this historic bridge to vanish, huge puff of smoke, we showed it to you yesterday, it's awesome because of the camera work and angle. catch it out again. the camera catches the explosives ripping through the 80-year-old span. it was caught by kurt and mike from austin, they did it with a camera at 300 frames per second. >> are we going to see it crumbling down? >> it crumbles so slowly. >> here we go, here we go. >> you can tell how slow it's going, because you
. >> we're here to support women, children, and provide education materials for them. >> a proposal by supervisor campos would create a buffer zone of 25 feet around planned parenthood. >> members of the -- confronted post master again ral during the national postal convention. they're asking him to reconsider the cuts. >> bringing it to the public's attention this, is an issue we'd like to keep our services. we'd like to keep our historic building autos overtime go as way. we've used things like buyouts for employees. i think we're responsible employ skbrer will continue to do that. >> the service lost 27% of mail volume because people are paying their bills online. a report showed the service is facing a budget gap. >> bart is looking at sharing bart trains and get along. >> it's a little bit tricky. amy hollyfield has the story. >> bikes allowed on bart trains this week. that doesn't necessarily mean they're welcome. >> in the way they pick up two, three chairs. you can move around five. sudden lits not a good i'd wherea to have them. it's crowded. >> officials say they've reconf
educated about all that medicaid they're not receiving. happy birthday spike lee, mr. rogers and 97 years ago today albert einstein first published his theory of relatively and then had to spend the rest of his life saying yeah nice theory, einstein. this isel "viewpoint." [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> john: good evening i'm john fugelsang and this is "viewpoint." thank you for joining us. if you thought that senate democrats were serious really serious about taking on the nra and passing major gun control legislation after the newtown school massacre, well, i hate to disappoint you but "the new york daily news" got it right with this devastating cover page. "shame on u-s on us, indeed. harry reid moved to drop california senator dianne feinstein's proposed assault weapons ban from the gun control legislation that's protected to reach the senate floor next month. harry reid said he would like to do it but the votes are against her. >> diane has worked so hard on this but urgent now her amendment using most the optimistic numbers has less than 40 votes. not 60. >> john: he's quite broken off. if ha
the republicans in congress are doing. >> clean water, public safety, public education, public transportation, public housing, public health, medicare, medicaid, social security, it just keeps on unraveling and unraveling and that's their point. >> she keeps talking about what they are against but are they for anything and can they all agree with it? >> they are obviously for big, big tax cuts, reverend al, and they are for cutting programs in the middle class. they've shown that time and time again. it's clear that the autopsy, which is what you do on a dead body, so that's interesting, is a farce. it's a complete farce. they are saying, okay, we want the votes of young people, african-americans, women, even gays, but we're not going to change our policies to attract you. we're not going to be anything different that will tell you why you should vote for us. so it's a rebranding without any meaning and it's just gotten the party -- i mean, it's gotten the fighting with one of another, are you leaving us out, and reince priebus having to backtrack immediately saying, no, marriage is one man,
for white house tours any more or education funding for our military because of sequestration. but you are telling me we got the money for the hot tunes and wine festival in delaware? i'm glad some of the liberals are beginning to realize that high taxes aren't helping people get out of poverty. we have just as many as ever in poverty. that huge chunk coming out of the paychecks is paying for stuff so embarrassingly stupid that not even liberals approve of it. [ applause ] >> mike: president obama just wrapped up his first trip to israel as president. it began with the president playing nice during a joint press conference with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. >> my main goal on this trip has been to have an opportunity to speak directly to the israeli people at a time when obviously what was already a pretty tough neighborhood has gotten tougher. and let them know that they have got a friend in the united states. that we have your back. that we consider israel's security of extraordinary importance to us. >> mike: but the next day while speaking to a younger audience the president u
to be educated, go to work and i'm an example of that. i was able to go to university, finish my degree and work and travel around the country looking the same way i'm looking now. but we knew that all of that will change and that new academics against women with him rise in the country in conflict zones and it turned to be the case, like trafficking of iraqi women, and it started immediately after the invasion. other issues like honor killings, which was fought really an iraqi story. >> i think the american media largely failed in telling the american people that iraqi women enjoyed much greater freedom under sadaam hussein than once they were liberated. maggie, you actually fought in iraq before joining iraq veterans against the war. can you explain the transformation you've experienced over the past 10 years? >> yeah, for me, i was 21 years old, 10 years ago waited to go to iraq. i was young and naive and idealistic and i didn't know that fox news wasn't fair and balanced, and you know, so a lot has changed since then. my experience in iraq, meeting iraqi people, seeing iraqi children, you kn
and ownership. when we're talking about the ability to educate your kid as you define, as you decide as a parent. those types of things really speaks to that much more than anything else in my view. >> michael steele, thank you very much. >> good to be with you. >> thanks for joining us and speaking back. >> and next, the president's trip to israel -- can he mend a strained relationship? >>> and still ahead, proof of citizenship. the supreme court takes up arizona's voter i.d. law today. this is "andrea mitchell reports" only on msnbc. i'm a conservative investor. but that doesn't mean i don't want to make money. i love making money. i try to be smart with my investments. i also try to keep my costs down. what's your plan? ishares. low cost and tax efficient. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. which shirt feels more expensive? i g
the constitution, myself. i'm reasonably well educated. and i thank you for the lecture. >> well, there you have it. this is the face of the new republican right. they basically are for everyone having a gun whenever they want it. in fact, they encourage you have to a gun. >> they have no shame, to go back to the mccarthy period. and i think senator cruz is one of those individuals. i mean, i think he'll demagogue this issue and it plays well for his constituency. and he -- you know, i think he might even believe some of this. >> let's take a look at the numbers here. you're familiar with this this. this is different between passion and effective politics. the people with passion on this issue tend to be the gun people. look at these numbers, though. if you look at the whole country, now. armed guards in schools, pretty close. what do you think of that 50%, 48%? >> it's an easy solution people think about. there are a lot of schools that have police officers. >> you don't have a big -- i don't either. what about this assault weapons ban? it's just about 57%, 3 out of 5. not a strong endorsement. >>
to seniors. we will not balance the budget on the backs of our kids' education or on the backs of our commitments to seniors. whether it is under medicare or medicaid. what we do is immediately begin to reduce the deficit so they're growing much slower than the economy. which is the important measure. and then we gradually get the balance in the year round 2040. which by the way is the same year that the republican balance last year, the budget last year came into balance before they changed their priority. their priority now is balance at all costs. and our approach is focus on jobs in the economy and get the deficit down in a smart way. >> let's talk about the sequester for just a moment. what's the likelihood at this point that the sequester stays in place for the rest of the year? the fiscal year? >> well, it would be a big mistake for it to stay in place. that's why we propose in our budget to replace it so you can get the same deficit reduction benefit but over a longer period of time. >> but political feasibility. what's the likelihood it stays in place? >> well, political feas
to the hispanic chamber of commerce in los angeles and talks about increasing federal aid for education to hispanics and african-americans. who in the party right now, who in the republican party gives that speech? >> i think the problem is deeper than that. even when they talk about aid to the less fortunate, they make it sound like they're dropping nickels in a tin cup. what mitt romney misses and what the republicans miss is that even rich people need government. even if it is just to build the runways for their golf stream jets. it is not a case of charity. we're all in this together. this is the essential message that barack obama ran on with robert and ran on again in his re-election campaign. the republicans don't get that basic concept. even when they're talking about government programs, they're talking about them as charity. they're not charity. >> steve schmidt we're out of time on this segment, need a quick word before you go. your reaction to cpac? >> i said a couple weeks ago, it has become the star wars bar scene of the conservative movement. it was certainly that and mor
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